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How the Red Carpet Evolved Into a Whole New Animal

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

Dior is classically ladylike, while Jennifer Lawrence is funny and irreverent. When she wore black Schiaparelli Couture to a premiere in 2015, she seemed to be in an altogether sexier comfort zone of her own. “If they’re not careful, actresses can end up looking bought and paid for by a brand,” says Jessica Morgan, co-founder of the celebrity fashion blog Go Fug Yourself. “I think if you have a really good stylist, you can overcome that, but these are a lot of weird business decisions people have to make that they didn’t have to make 10 years ago.”

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Michelle Williams on the Pleasure of Ageing and the Joys of Bringing Up a Girl

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

Williams is charming and kind, but I do not get the sense that she’s an extrovert. She is guarded – which is entirely reasonable: it’s only a few years since she was hounded by paparazzi after the death of her daughter’s dad, Heath Ledger. She speaks deliberately and slowly, choosing her words with caution, and her sentences sometimes tail off into such a quiet whisper that my recording device doesn’t catch the audio at all.

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How The Crown Made Me a Reluctant Royalist

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

Claire Foy turns the silent monarch I was previously familiar with into a human being with a beating heart – a woman who was young, and had to give up all semblance of a normal life in order to fulfil an inherited duty. I’m sorry, I’m starting to sound like the Daily Telegraph.

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Is It Ever Ethical to Turn Off the News?

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

Is it psychologically wise to go cold turkey on current affairs, turning temporarily away from global doom and gloom? Or do we have a moral responsibility to keep listening and watching, regardless of our stress levels? We asked a charity worker, a professor of journalism, a politician, a columnist and a psychotherapist for their views.

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Ellen Is the Hero the World Needs this Week

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

She began The Ellen DeGeneres Show in 2003, and today it still runs five days a week. It has turned her into one of America’s biggest names. It’s as cosy and cheerful a show as you can imagine, and yet because DeGeneres presents it, it’s socially important: it’s a piece of mainstream culture helmed by a married lesbian, in an age where many in America want to roll back equal marriage rights. Gay girls growing up now can see a lesbian icon on the chat show favoured by their grandparents.

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Maggie Aderin-Pocock on What It's Like to Be a Black Woman in Britain Today

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

Several of those interviewed in Black Is The New Black say that their parents told them, “You have to work twice as hard as the next person to get the same recognition.” Aderin-Pocock jokes that in theory she should be working four times as hard, because she’s both black and female. While studying for her PhD, she once attended a lunch at which someone mistook her for a secretary. “There was a clatter of a fork and the table fell silent. Everybody looked at me, thinking ‘OK, she’s going to blow him up on the spot.’ And I thought about it for a second, and I said very calmly, ‘Actually no, I’m studying for my PhD here,’ and he said ‘Oh I didn’t realise!’ and continued the conversation.”

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Why, 25 Years Later, this Self-Help Manual Remains Essential Reading

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

Never – despite one friend’s enthusiastic championing of Why Men Marry Bitches – have I heard as much about a self-help book as I’ve heard about Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way. It’s the 1991 manual that has spent 25 years popping up in conversations between creatives and wannabe creatives of all types; it’s the printed version of a cheerleading squad, which promises to help anybody – be they a sculptor or a pharmacist by trade – to unleash their inner artist. 

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Unpicking the Pamela Anderson Fascination

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

Pamela Anderson and I, to be honest, have very little in common. She’s a Canadian pin-up with a history of wild, rock-star affairs (Tommy Lee, Bret Michaels, Kid Rock); I’m a British journalist who has never tried cocaine. She personifies glamour; I haven’t washed my face today. She has huge, pneumatic breasts; mine are several inches lower. Speaking of things that are close to my heart – did I mention that I love her? 

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The TV Show That Calls BS on the Term "Little Old Lady"

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

Grace And Frankie, the comedy drama about two divorcees whose husbands ran off with each other, is the only show I’m aware of, other than The Golden Girls, that focuses on a glorious generation of women over 70. It unashamedly talks about their ambitions, their sex lives, their bodies and their opinions with an honesty that I have never seen elsewhere – plus a humour and matter-of-factness that entirely normalises the conversation. It is, without hyperbole, ground-breaking television.

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Cassa Pancho on Creating Ballet Black

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

"I’m mixed race, with Trinidadian and British parents. I trained in ballet at the Royal Academy of Dance, where there were some Asian students, but there were no other mixed-race or black students. When it came to writing my dissertation, I thought, 'I’ll interview four or five professional British black ballerinas, and ask them about their challenges and experiences.' But there were none – they didn't exist."

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