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Filtering by Category: health

One in 50 Women Will Get Ovarian Cancer at Some Point. Know the Symptoms

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

I met Rebecca Readshaw about eight years ago, long before she was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. She is the warm, down-to-earth wife of a friend – a BBC camera operator and floor manager with a nose ring, tattoos and a huge smile. She was 31 when she got her diagnosis; at 32, she underwent major surgery, during which her womb, her ovaries, most of her bowel, the bottom lining of her diaphragm and her appendix were removed.

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Please Don’t Take “Office Cake Culture” Away From Us

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

Outside of sugar, what is there to offer a ray of light in an otherwise gloomy work day? There’s flirting with a colleague – fun, but usually ill-advised (and not really an option if you’re a straight woman working in women’s magazines). There are cigarette breaks, which are just as bad for you as sugar, and much more expensive. But mainly, in this country, we rely on good old dependable tea – the crutch of our nation. When I was an office worker, on the really bad days I could spend about 30 per cent of my time standing in the kitchen, sighing heavily while waiting for the kettle to boil. And yet the joy of caffeine can only stretch so far.

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A Lesson Learnt in 2016: Living in the Now Is the Only Way to Live

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

In one sense, “Live in the moment!” is the kind of wisdom that you can buy on a beach towel, share in an Instagram meme or unwrap in a fortune cookie – so banal and overused that we barely register the phrase. At the other, more earnest end of the spectrum, it morphs into the idea of mindfulness – paying painstaking attention to every sensation and emotion as we experience it. But, this year, living in the moment has come to mean something else to me: it’s been practical, it’s been necessary and it’s been something of a relief.

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The Abortion Pill – Giving Options to Women at Home and, Crucially, Further Afield

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

For Laura, the main concern was not the expense, but the fact that she was breaking the law. “I was panicking,” she says. “I thought, ‘The police are going to come to my door – they’re going to have caught on.’ It could have been really bad; career-wise, there’s no way I would have been able to keep up the teaching.” She told her husband that if the pill caused complications and he had to take her to the hospital, he mustn’t mention the medication she’d taken. “I remember saying, ‘Promise me you will not do that. Promise me you won’t.’”

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It's Wrong to Assume Egg Freezing Is Just for Women Who Want to Delay Motherhood

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

f you read some of the articles and opinion pieces on the matter, you might assume that the life of a childless thirtysomething is a 24/7 funfair of casual sex and career striving – that we “delay motherhood” with a shrug, certain that we can try it in our forties, like taking a ceramics class or training for a marathon. But the women I know who tried to become mothers in their late thirties or forties have largely waited not because they wanted to go travelling first (although, personally, I think that’s a perfectly fine reason) – but because the opportunity wasn’t there to have a child earlier.

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Can Ballet Be Body-Positive?

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

I was three years old, painfully shy and totally uncoordinated when I started ballet classes. I’m not an athletic person – later, I would fake period pain every week in an attempt to avoid swimming or PE – but, thanks to those classes, I always danced. I attended ballet two or three times a week for about 15 years, and it taught me to stand up tall and take control of my unruly arms and legs; it gave me pride in my body as a functional machine. I cared about alignment and extension – I cared enough to point my feet so hard that my knees almost bent backwards. I’m one of many women who never had a shot at being a ballerina, but who were indelibly marked by the dance training they had as kids.

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Can OMGYes Help to Eliminate 10 Years of Bad Sex?

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

“I think that women and their partners are still trying to figure out how you talk about sex – how you talk about parts of the vulva, how you talk about how it is that you want to be touched,” says Dr Debby Herbenick, assistant professor at the Indiana University School of Health, and researcher at the famed Kinsey Institute. She’s discussing the rationale behind Lydia Daniller and Rob Perkins' sex-ed website OMGYes.com, for which she carried out the first ever large-scale, nationally representative American study on the specifics of women’s pleasure. “A lot of people don’t really have the words for that, in the way that we have words for sexual positions, for example.”

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A Change Is Often a Whole Lot Better Than a Rest

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

The visual food we give our brains is not a trivial matter. For most people, sight is the primary sense; it feeds us information when we aren’t even paying attention. Reframing your life in a new setting – changing up the backdrop against which you process experiences and make decisions – can help you see tired problems with fresh eyes.

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Making the Case For a 4-Day Week

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

The economist John Maynard Keynes must be turning in his grave. In 1930, he predicted that within the next century, we’d have solved so many of the world’s problems that we would only need to work 15 hours a week. He was right that our species would make unprecedented progress in that time – but it has not resulted in the “Great! So I’ll spend Wednesday to Sunday on my reading” mentality that he anticipated.

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