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Michelle Williams on the Pleasure of Ageing and the Joys of Bringing Up a Girl

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

Williams is charming and kind, but I do not get the sense that she’s an extrovert. She is guarded – which is entirely reasonable: it’s only a few years since she was hounded by paparazzi after the death of her daughter’s dad, Heath Ledger. She speaks deliberately and slowly, choosing her words with caution, and her sentences sometimes tail off into such a quiet whisper that my recording device doesn’t catch the audio at all.

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Is It Ever Ethical to Turn Off the News?

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

Is it psychologically wise to go cold turkey on current affairs, turning temporarily away from global doom and gloom? Or do we have a moral responsibility to keep listening and watching, regardless of our stress levels? We asked a charity worker, a professor of journalism, a politician, a columnist and a psychotherapist for their views.

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Maggie Aderin-Pocock on What It's Like to Be a Black Woman in Britain Today

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

Several of those interviewed in Black Is The New Black say that their parents told them, “You have to work twice as hard as the next person to get the same recognition.” Aderin-Pocock jokes that in theory she should be working four times as hard, because she’s both black and female. While studying for her PhD, she once attended a lunch at which someone mistook her for a secretary. “There was a clatter of a fork and the table fell silent. Everybody looked at me, thinking ‘OK, she’s going to blow him up on the spot.’ And I thought about it for a second, and I said very calmly, ‘Actually no, I’m studying for my PhD here,’ and he said ‘Oh I didn’t realise!’ and continued the conversation.”

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How to Sliding Doors Your Life

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

You’re 17 years old. You have no idea what you want to be when you grow up, but you apply for a geography degree – and you’re successful. Off you go to university, and towards the end of your final year, you attend a career fair where you are wooed into a conversation with an accountancy firm that’s giving out free mugs. When you graduate, you train as an accountant – because that’s a great career, isn’t it? You keep ticking along, until a decade or two later, when you’re forced to confront an uncomfortable fact: that you dread work every Monday, and your life is making you miserable.

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Catherine Mayer: Why I Founded the Women’s Equality Party

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

"I wondered aloud about how to break the log jam in politics around achieving gender equality, and I said that the one thing that UKIP had shown was that if you start taking votes away from the parties, it can galvanise them into trying to look more like you. I said, 'What about if I do the same thing for gender equality? Why don’t I found a women’s equality party, and maybe that will put these issues to the top of the agenda? If anybody wants to discuss it, I’ll be in the bar.'"

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Cassa Pancho on Creating Ballet Black

Added on by Hattie Crisell.

"I’m mixed race, with Trinidadian and British parents. I trained in ballet at the Royal Academy of Dance, where there were some Asian students, but there were no other mixed-race or black students. When it came to writing my dissertation, I thought, 'I’ll interview four or five professional British black ballerinas, and ask them about their challenges and experiences.' But there were none – they didn't exist."

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